Books & Literature

Four emerging writers speak about their work, who inspires them, the rituals they follow and what excites them about Asian American literature.
Karissa Chen
April 13, 2018
A Review of The Charm Buyers by Lillian Howan
Roy Kamada
March 4, 2018
Evelyn NienMing Chien
May 24, 2021
By the time I embraced Korean culture, it was suddenly desirable. Being Korean was cool. Having my birth culture enter the mainstream was complicated as an American-raised adoptee. I felt guilty that I didn’t know about Korean culture until it was popular and embarrassed that I didn’t grow up the child of Korean parents or with any connection to Korean culture. I felt guilty because I did not feel like I had earned the benefits of the Korean brand.
Samantha Rauer
May 11, 2021
Excerpt from Chapter 1 of Elizabeth Miki Brina's memoir, "Speak, Okinawa"
Elizabeth Miki Brina
February 28, 2021
When I am too tired to decipher my parents’ conversations in Filipino, I focus on how they speak. Intonations rising and falling like a tide. Enunciation everywhere, most syllables stressed. Voices raised even as they say something loving. They talk quickly, confident in their pronunciations of words that would trip up my tongue.
Isabella Peralta
January 7, 2021
"That somehow a name was the blade of your fate, held to your throat all your life."
K-Ming Chang
December 21, 2020
"Your mother catches you. Calls you yeppuh, beautiful, which startles you, and then she remarks that ramen will give you fat hips."
Joanna Kim
November 2, 2020
Book Review of Green Lantern Legacy by Minh Lê
Jerry Dear
September 8, 2020
"When I was younger, I used to worry what people would think if they knew I was a girl who ate shrimp heads. My reluctant half slurps made me taste more air and less umami. Shame got in the way of a perfectly good meal, so I refrained from Asian foods often described as gross, weird, and foreign."  
Kristen Gaerlan
September 8, 2020
A Review of Wild Geese Sorrow by Jeffrey Thomas Leong
Evelyn NienMing Chien
August 21, 2020
“Gotta go, bye!” was just one of the many pieces of knowledge I folded into my everyday expressions after watching the latest episode of Sabrina the Teenage Witch. The phrase was a tell-tale sign that she was up to something, a quick and finite way of removing herself from any situation to scutter off toward mischief. 
An Uong
August 15, 2020
A Vietnamese American poet guides his readers through the irresolvable terrain of Vietnamese and American memories of the war-torn past
Cathy Duong
August 15, 2020

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